165: Leaders with Heart Show Grace

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In this episode, Heather interviews Eddy Badrina, CEO of Eden Green and Co-founder of Buzzshift. This 20-minute podcast is filled with insightful information about his innovative company Eden Green and what it takes to be a leader. Eddy attributes most of his leadership values to his parents, who immigrated from the Philippines with little to their name and made a life for themselves in Houston, TX. From a young age, Eddy was shown what he refers to as “sacrificial leadership” by his parents who would send over 50% of their income back to the Philippines.. 

Eddy Badrina has an impressive background which includes working in President Bush Sr.’s administration and being a co-founder of Buzzshift. Now as a CEO, he is the most essential leader of the company and in this podcast, he shares with us the knowledge he has acquired over the last 20 years.

Key Takeaways:

  • Eden Green technology is on a mission to change the way farming is done and people are being fed. 
  • Good leaders don’t compare themselves to others, they compare themselves to who they were yesterday.
  • Grace is not common in business, but it should be. 
  • You are more than your company and you are more than your title.

Eddy Badrina is based out of Dallas, TX, and is the CEO of Eden Green and Co-founder of Buzzshift. His company Eden Green Technology is a vertical farming technology company that seamlessly combines traditional greenhouses and technological greenhouses into one, where they offer the greenhouses themselves as the service accompanied with the management, overseeing, and staffing that comes with vertical farming technology. 

Before Eden Green, Eddy co-founded Buzzshift, a digital strategy agency, and also worked for many years in the US Department of State with various leadership roles. He graduated from Texas A&M University and the Bush School for Government and Public Service. Eddy has over 20 years of experience in growing organizations and leading teams.

Being self-aware

If my leadership journey was a marathon I like to think that I’m probably in mile 13 or 14, I’ve hit my pace and now I’m just trying to improve with every mile. Good leaders don’t ever compare themselves to others, and I don’t like to be visionary or futuristic, I just work on becoming better than I was yesterday

In a marathon, I’m probably in mile 13 or 14, I’ve hit my pace and now I’m just trying to improve with every mile. – Eddy Badrina #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Where I Learned How to Lead

My parents came to America from the Philippines with little to their name and they were able to slowly establish themselves in Houston, and establish leadership positions within the community. I watched them do this as they worked, and as working immigrants, they would send over 50% of their income back to the Philippines while still maintaining their own household. I learned how to be a leader by simply watching my parents live their everyday lives.

The really good self-aware leaders aren't trying to compare themselves to others. – Eddy Badrina #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

It's a legacy to lead. – Eddy Badrina #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Ethical Roots to His Company

I joined the company in 2019, and what I really fell in love with was the reason why they wanted to create this business. The founders are two brothers from South Africa, and one year they were passing out food at a South African fair when a five-year-old boy came up to them and started hoarding all the candy. At first, they were confused, and let the little boy know that there was more candy – and that there was no need to take it all at once. The little boy replied with “ this isn’t for me it’s for my sister, today I don’t eat”,  and that was when they realized that there were still children in the world that we’re not eating. Both of the brothers are engineers and they came up with this idea of having a more economical and environmentally friendly approach to farming, and when they approached me with the idea I just couldn’t say no.

There was this demand inside our household for excellence and diligence in whatever we were doing. – Eddy Badrina #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

I think if people had more grace in the business setting businesses would be more robust in the long-term. – Eddy Badrina #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet


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Modeling Caring Leadership Behaviors in Hard Times

caring leadership behaviors

If you’ve been following my blog or my journey, or if you just found me, you may have heard that on Tuesday, April 13th, I published my second book, The Art of Caring Leadership: How Leading with Heart Uplifts Teams and Organizations. And, while I’ve written about Caring Leadership extensively in the past, today I want to give you all a glimpse of some of the Caring Leadership behaviors that my book outlines and details with real-life examples of Caring Leaders. 

Together, we will explore what it means to model these Caring Leader behaviors, but rather than discuss them at a general level, I will reveal three Caring Leader behaviors as seen in a common organizational struggle. 

How many of us have been a part of an organization going through a major change, one which affects all levels of the business? Well, I have been through times like these, and I recently heard about someone else’s similar experience and was inspired to write this post.

What organizational struggle am I referring to? The merger. If any of you have ever been through a merger, then you might be all too familiar with the power struggle and chaos of reforming an organization from top to bottom. 

A participant in my weekly HR Community Power Hour recently shared with me the hardship of a merger and the clouds it has cast, making it hard to pinpoint where exactly Caring Leadership exists within the organization. The scale of change brought about by a merger can take up all of the leadership team’s time and energy, leaving them little room to focus on other important things—their employees and their wellbeing. 

Before you can have a great leadership team, you have to have great leaders. Each one must stand in their own shoes, understand the behaviors of a Caring Leader, and choose to dedicate themselves to these behaviors and actions each day, within and outside the walls of the workplace. 

A Deeper Look at Three Caring Leadership Behaviors:

If you find yourself as part of a leadership team while your organization enters into a more stressful or demanding phase of change, I challenge you to hone in on the following Caring Leadership behaviors: Self-Leadership, Making Others Feel Important, and Creating a Listening Culture.

How does a leader model Self-Leadership? Why is this specific behavior one that deserves attention, especially when work seems to zap all of our time and energy?

If you are constantly giving of yourself to big projects and time-consuming problem-solving, you are clearly a leader that finds themself caught up in the day-to-day operations of the company, with little or no room left for the act of leadership. I challenge each of you to take a small step back and choose to focus on your own needs at least once this week.

How can you show yourself empathy and compassion amidst the fast-paced and demanding nature of your work? How will you exercise self-care and by consequence, self-leadership this week?

Me? I’m going to get my workout in each day, because I know without that “me time” each morning, I won’t be able to focus or give as much of myself to my work and the people that deserve my undivided attention. 

How does a leader model making others feel important? Why is this behavior crucial, especially when our jobs seem to be keeping us on the edge of our seats as our organizations steamroll through crazy times?

If your company is in the trenches of mapping out a merger, then the operational requirements of overseeing this change probably leave little room to invest in the other parts of your organization—your people. After you take some time to meet your own needs this week, I challenge you to raise your head from the work in front of you and to turn towards your employees. Extend the warmth of greeting them with empathy and compassion. If you are stressed and feeling worn down through this trying period, then I guarantee your employees are feeling those exact emotions. Showing them appreciation and attention, especially when the going gets tough, will prove to them your level of true care. 

How does a leader model their ability to listen? Why is this behavior absolutely important when we find ourselves and our organizations stretched too thin in the face of rapid change?

When we find ourselves bogged down by work that demands our full attention, we tend to lessen our focus on how we show up, as stress and time constraints weigh us down. When I think back on that conversation with my colleague on that HR Community Call, I imagine that the leaders who were creating confusion and tension were, themselves, feeling the same. As a leader, your job is to guide the people. You lead your team. Before being able to assist with operational tasks, you must be there for your employees. The best way to show them you care and help lessen the blows dealt by experiences like mergers, is to turn your attention to them and listen to them. And then affirm what you hear through action. I cannot stress enough how important it is to take in feedback, process it, act upon it, and then connect the dots for those who provided the feedback, on how you intend to move forward. 

If you are interested in learning more about the other 6 Caring Leadership behaviors, you should read The Art of Caring Leadership.

If your interest extends beyond just reading the book, then I would like to personally invite you to complete The Caring Leadership Self-Assessment, join the Caring Leadership Community, and consider taking a course, or working with a coach in the Caring Leadership Academy

I look forward to welcoming you to every aspect of this Caring Leadership ecosystem my team and I have worked so hard to create, to help develop Caring Leaders and improve organizations across the globe!

164: Leaders with Heart Embrace Your Crazy

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In this episode, Heather interviews Janine Williams, the CEO and Founder of Impulsify, a software company that equips businesses with simple, affordable technology solutions. She refers to herself as a “reluctant CEO” who believed in a product and decided she wouldn’t take no for an answer.

Janine believes in “The Adversity Advantage” and her story is quite unique. Her obstacles to overcome adversity began as a young girl and she is proud of what she has built today. She credits her outcome to her foster mother, Mary Elizabeth Hudson, who changed the course of her life from a troubled teenaged girl to a CEO. Janine is vulnerable, relatable, and you can just tell she has the biggest heart – most importantly, she is honest and aware of her flaws as a leader. Listen to Janine’s story as she takes us through what led her to where she is today.

Key Takeaways:

  • Embrace The Crazy.
  • Don’t listen to the naysayers.
  • Surround yourself with entrepreneurs, business developers, and like-minded individuals.
  • Being a CEO means that she doesn’t get the privilege to put her negative emotions onto her team. 
  • When you truly believe you are better than the situation you are in, you will do anything possible to get out of it. 
  • Recognize that resumes, schools, and experience don’t always mean that the passion, drive, or grit will be there. 
  • Give others the opportunities you wish someone had given you.

Janine Williams is the CEO, and Founder of Impulsify, a software company that equips businesses with simple, affordable technology solutions. She refers to herself as a “reluctant CEO” who believed in a product and decided she wouldn’t take no for an answer. She has been a “reluctant CEO” for 8 years now with a successful company based out of Denver, Colorado. 

She had no previous experience with software – she was actually an English major – but she saw an opportunity and truly believed she could fill it. Many people doubted her but this served as her motivation. One day she went on Facebook to search for someone who could build software, and that person has now been her partner for the past ten years. Janine and her partner have successfully scaled the company to what it is now and have plans to continue on this upward path.

Believing in Yourself

  • Janine Williams is a single mother of four, an English major, and a teacher who taught Shakespeare. She had no idea how to build software but she was good at marketing. She actually met her business partner through a Facebook post (who now does the coding). 
  • Her drive comes from proving the people who doubted her wrong. She isn’t big on resumes or experience – she wants the passion, grit, and drive. 
  • Janine takes a lot of pride in going from “basically homeless” to becoming who she is today. She has a tremendous heart for women and young girls who are constantly doubted and deprived of opportunity and does everything she can to uplift them and give them a chance to succeed just like Mary did for her. 
  • Janine opened up about losing her temper six months ago and it leading to the loss of one of her beloved employees. She was honest about regretting this behavior and it made her realize that the leader doesn’t get to have those moments towards their team. That situation made her lose a great employee and was a huge learning lesson for her – now she tries to avoid that by taking more time for self-care, vacations, and spending time with her family.

There is no wrong path to finding your leadership, but there is something unique in people who overcome adversity and then use it as a positive rather than a crutch – Janine Williams #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Turning Adversity Into a Positive

  • Two months ago she lost her foster mother who took her in when she was 13 because she was living alone. She lost her in January and decided to honor her through her LinkedIn post. This post went viral and is actually how Heather found her. She wanted to show people that someone can have such a grand effect on someone’s life, her foster mom saw potential in her and that changed the entire course of her life. Now millions of people know Mary Hudson’s name. 
  • Her leadership style: “The Adversity Advantage”, “there is no wrong path to finding your leadership but there is something unique in people who overcome adversity and then use it as a positive rather than a crutch”.

There is nothing that you can't do when you truly believe 'I am better than this situation' – Janine Williams #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

People ask, 'How did you do it? How did you transfer from teaching high school English to running a software company?' And I was like, 'Google!' – Janine Williams #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Seeing an Opportunity and Taking It

  • Janine has previously launched a company similar to amazon that would supply hospitality industries with their needs, like Marriot, where they could use a single interface to order their supplies instead of having to go to Costco. 
  • Before her software, they didn’t have a way to track what sells/doesn’t/demand. Millions of dollars in retail sales were not being tracked. 
  • She saw this as an opportunity and is where her current company, Impulsify, was born from.

 


 

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Caring Leadership Came Alive During the Pandemic

Today is the day that my second book, The Art of Caring Leadership: How Leading With Heart Uplifts Teams & Organizations, officially launches!

Of course, I’d be lying if I told you I embarked on this journey alone, or that the journey has been an easy one. At the beginning of the pandemic, and for the first few weeks thereafter, I felt nervous. Often, in a down economy, leadership and organizational development services are the first to go. As a speaker, trainer, coach, and consultant almost everything shut down for about two months. It was nuts!

But when I turned my attention back to the manuscript for this book, I realized it had never been more timely. My publisher offered me a grace period given all we were facing, but instead I kept that first deadline in my mind and raced toward it. I didn’t want to wallow in the temporary pause on business. I wanted to honor my commitment to my editor and my promise to myself.

Now, on this day, April 13, 2021, my book dreams have become a reality for the second time. This is the day that thousands of copies of The Art of Caring Leadership drop ship around the world to places like Japan, Switzerland, and Dubai. The impact of my words and the words of over 80 leaders who I interviewed for the book will empower leaders to uplift teams and organizations everywhere!

The more global leaders read my words and the real stories of leaders who understand what it means to lead with heart, the better. And the best part is, we’ve created an entire system to support them! From a Caring Leadership Self-Assessment, Caring Leadership Community, Caring Leadership Academy, and even Caring Leadership coaches. You can find out more about those here.

It is my dream to see leaders in any role express more concern and kindness toward those they lead in consistent ways. I know, deep down, that this will result in their team members finally feeling valued for who they are – and not just what they can do.

I have had very few leaders in my life to whom I refer to as caring. That’s because it IS hard work and, up until this point, not clearly defined. I can tell you that, when I think back on those who consistently expressed that they cared for me, my heart smiles.

Thus, I invite you to not only embark on a Caring Leadership journey with me, but to remember the moments when you experienced caring leadership for yourself. What did that feel like? Hold onto that. Those memories and those feelings will get you through the desert moments of leadership.

If you focus on leading with heart, you will touch lives.

For me and so many other leaders, the need for caring leadership came alive during the pandemic. Consider this your invitation: to do your part to ensure the light of caring leadership continues to burn brightly, no matter what crises we face in future.

163: Leaders with Heart Lead with Compassion

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In this episode, Heather interviews Taneshia Nash Laird, president & CEO of Newark Symphony Hall, the vintage 1925 performing arts center in Newark, NJ. The way that Taneshia came to be on Heather’s podcast reveals a uniqueness that accompanies this episode until its end. 

The first word Taneshia uses to describe her leadership style is compassionate. This deep found sense of compassion that Taneshia claims to strive for, is revealed through each story and experience which she shares. Taneshia is an incredibly compassionate leader, an imperfect, eager to grow, caring leader in development. Please listen to her story to find some inspiration for your own.

Key Takeaways:

  • Leaders are coaches, investing in people professionally. 
  • Caring Leaders guide their employees towards their respective destinations and heal the organization. 
  • Have a willingness to invest in your people.
  • Discover and unearth the strengths of your team at the earliest opportunity. 
  • Leaders have the positive power to change the lives of those they lead. 
  • Fill the space created through the lay-off process with compassion. 
  • Recognize that the work is not more important than your team’s self-care and health. 
  • Take the time to ask, ”is there anything I can do to help you navigate through these times?”

Taneshia Nash Laird is president & CEO of Newark Symphony Hall, the vintage 1925 performing arts center in Newark, NJ. As a social change agent, Taneshia centers cultural equity in her work. In her career in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors, she has been a city and state official for economic development, a regional director for the U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce, the executive director of the Arts Council of Princeton, and co-founder of the MIST Harlem venue in NYC.

An in-demand speaker about the intersection of arts, entertainment and economic development, Taneshia is a member of the board of the National Independent Venue Foundation and co-chairs the Save Our Stages Implementation Task Force of the National Independent Venue Association. She is also president of the board of Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation, the influential community arts nonprofit co-founded 25 years ago by siblings Danny, Russell and Joey “Rev. Run” Simmons.

Taneshia is also an adjunct professor in the B.S. in Entertainment and Arts Management degree program at Drexel University and a visiting professor in the M.F.A. in Creative Arts & Technology at Bloomfield College.

Resilience is key

I am leading a 95-year-old historic Performing Arts Center in a community of color, which is one of the reasons that I was attracted to the role. The organization wasn’t just in decline but in crisis. So, I am turning around a historic organization and venue, and leading it through the global pandemic. Resilience does describe my background professionally and personally. This is the third nonprofit that I’ve run. I’ve been a for profit,  nonprofit, and a municipal appointed leader so I’ve been a trisector leader.

One of the things I have to figure out is how to balance being a compassionate person but also still setting some good, firm expectations. – Tanesha Nash Laird #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Investment on impact

I like to think that I’m a compassionate leader. When I came there, I found that not only had the building been neglected, but the people had been as well. The building needs a $40 million renovation. So, I’m leading a pretty significant capital campaign to renovate the building and to also turn the organization around. I also like to think that I’m more of a coach. A lot of what I’m doing is supporting them in terms of their journey and their career, as they hadn’t been invested in professionally in developing their skills. I felt that it was important to invest in those people. They were really punching above their weight, because I was asking them to do a lot, but it was very targeted and was very focused. We also put together a customized professional development plan for each of the employees and my colleagues, as well. Investment on impact to the Community—that’s the way I approach.

Give colleagues some space during this time and be understanding that it's high stress. – Tanesha Nash Laird #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

I'm more of a coach. A lot of what I'm doing is supporting them in terms of their journey and their career. – Tanesha Nash Laird #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

Putting compassion

I remember my first nonprofit role about 15 years ago where I had to make a staff change, and I really felt like I could have done that better. I could have been more compassionate. Sometimes you do have to make these changes, and it’s still a horrible thing that you have to do to meet the objectives. Most recent case, frankly, is the pandemic, so loss of revenue and ability to continue to carry for full staff, but now I’m better at laying people off. It’s still difficult, please don’t get me wrong. It’s very difficult, especially you have to do everything, what gets in all these situations. You have to do everything in a particularly legal way and it doesn’t leave as much room. But as much room as it leaves, I put compassion.

Work is important, but your self-care and your health are actually more important. – Tanesha Nash Laird #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet

In order for the organization to move forward, I can't be coddling all the time. – Tanesha Nash Laird #leadershipwithheart Click To Tweet


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Caring Leadership Is a Team Sport

teamwork

I am a fast-moving person who drives for success. I also lead with my heart. Often, I am moving so fast that I outrun my own capabilities, and I have a hard time asking for help. When I take the time to pause, I release the need to control everything around me and invite others in. This is the only way I am successful in moving forward. Consequently, I often learn that I must allow others to help me shoulder the burden. 

It is in my nature to want to control everything, which may be why my career has guided me here. In the past, I have learned that this type of management style is not productive for myself or my team. Thankfully, I realized this many, many years ago. Now, I teach others what I had to learn the hard way. 

I believe that involving others and making it a team sport is the most productive thing a leader can do. For one, it takes the stress off from your shoulders and allows you to focus on the big picture. Additionally, it will enable the team members to show up and make a contribution. 

I’m a firm believer in the Richard Branson mentality of “Train people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don’t want to.” The goal is to uplift every team member and expand – this will result in higher productivity and easier organizational expansion. 

Being open and letting your team know that you need help does more than increase productivity. It demonstrates that as a leader, you are not perfect. It shows that even though you are the leader of this organization, you need the team’s help to accomplish goals. Allowing your team to feel like they are part of the big picture will help in the organization’s long-term success. Being vulnerable and allowing your team to be part of the solution demonstrates caring leadership and builds the personal relationship that you have with your team. 

The most successful and beloved CEOs provide caring leadership whether they recognize it or not. For example, Gary Kelly, CEO of Southwest Airlines, is highly personable with his entire staff. He takes the time to learn the first and last names of his employees – no matter what seniority level they hold. This type of personal relationship with his employees is what makes them loyal to his organization. Whether it be marketing, finance, or operations, he knows his people and can involve them in the decision-making process on a personal level. 

On the other hand, leaders who do not allow their teams to participate will often have less productivity as a result. This is because instead of being involved, the team members are simply just completing orders. This type of leadership is the opposite of what I strive to teach others, as it results in lower productivity and employee satisfaction. This combination is harmful to the organization and is a perfect storm for unhappy employees. 

In my book, The Art of Caring Leadership, I dive deep into how to involve your employees in the decision-making process successfully and how to delegate tasks with ease. I encourage you to pre-order my new book here as I go more into detail and share the stories of other caring leaders who are from around the world.